Mission Invertebrate

This weekend I was back at The Regent's Park helping with their project Mission Invertebrate. This project is funded by the People's Postcode Lottery and is investigating what invertebrates live in The Regent's Park and how this relates to where the Park's hedgehog population lives. The project is a citizen science project - members of …

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Fieldwork finished!

After what feels like ages (actually, 5 months is quite a long time!) I have finished my fieldwork, hurrah! I sampled soil and leaf-litter invertebrates, and microbes, in total of 38 sites in 6 different land-use types (deciduous forest, coniferous forest, heathland, pasture, cropland and urban areas) with the aim to compare how species differ …

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Throwback Thursday – Chasing flies in Scotland

This Throwback Thursday is from my trip to Scotland with the Dipterists Forum in September 2013, a wonderful week in the highlands collecting flies which I wrote up as a guest post for the Natural History Museum Curator of Diptera’s Blog.     Chasing flies in Scotland Between handing in my MSc thesis and my viva …

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Throwback Thursday – Balcony Beasties

This week's Throwback Thursday is about the cabbage white butterflies I had on my London balcony back in August 2013 while I was studying for my MSc. This also formed the basis of an article in the Amateur Entomologist's Society Bug Club Magazine. Balcony beasties – cabbage whites and their enemies It is true you …

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My first music festival – with science!

I enjoy music, but until now had never been to a music festival, all those crowds of people, loud noise and camping was not something I thought I could cope with. However I was aware from talking to my colleagues at the University of Reading last year that festivals are not just about music, and often …

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